• From Farm to Flower

April 30, 2020

From the minute I pulled into the long tree-lined drive of Osamequin Farm I could feel the calm.  The farm sits just outside of the city and is really a breath of fresh air as is the FarmHer who runs the non-profit farm. 

Sarah Turkus found her way into farming after college and it has been a cornerstone ever since.  I met her at the end of the long drive, there at the barn.  She was ready to start the day so we set out with a few happy dogs on our trail. 

The first stop was at a greenhouse to water seedlings that she had started and was going to transplant soon.  As she worked, she explained the farm to me.  It is organized as a non-profit and while she is the manager of the farm and definitely a FarmHer herself, she is not alone in the venture.  The farm houses multiple small farms - almost a cooperative of sorts.  It provides community, fields, and camaraderie that the farmers - most of which have other day jobs - are looking for. 

Certain parts of the farm are also open to visitors, such as the blueberry patch, which was our next stop. We made our way out towards the road and there spent a little time with Sarah as she checked the progress of the fruit.  She explained that people can come to pick their own berries on the farm, which is enjoyable for many in the surrounding community.  Across the road Sarah pointed at a big, open field, explaining that there are big plans for the young farm in the coming years. 

With the expansion of multiple fields, a farm stand, and other projects, there is no shortage of work for this FarmHer!  Next up we stopped at a shed to gather up crates full of vases to hold the flowers she needed to harvest for an upcoming order.  While the farm produces many different types of food, it was easy to see that Sarah’s passion was with the flowers.

Fields of bright colored blooms sat at the back edge of the farm, with many, many more to come as the summer months bring their warmth.   I took to my camera as I watched Sarah work and talk about her plans for expanding the flower part of the farm.  From there the day was nearly complete but first, we had to make a quick stop for egg collection from the resident ducks.  


The day spent at Osamequin Farm was as calm and comfortable as my first feelings about the farm.  As I got to know Sarah throughout the day, I realized that while the farm held a certain beauty, the FarmHer of the farm definitely has a strong hand in that.  Sarah is smart and sure of herself as she works to build the farm for her fellow farmers and to make it sustainable for the future. 




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